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20121010
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
degree is in medical technology. my family always wanted a doctor, and so i headed toward the sciences. and going to medical school was something that i knew would be beneficial to the "race," world race, my race. but my thinking was, "i don't want to be a doctor who paints. i think i want to be a painter." it was like i was already an artist, but i mean, i just, i sort of had to say that to myself. my first interest is in the structure of something. and so when i start out making something, i'm not thinking about who might have lived there. i'm thinking about how i want it to look. structure for me is number one. and then i will decide who might have lived there. somes i will move away frowhat i'm working on and look at it -- look back at it -- and move around it and look at it. it's a process of getting a fresh look at something. it's like working on a drawing and you back up to see what your perspective is. and you see how you're doing -- how if it's flowing the way you want it flow, if it's moving the way you want it to move. i bent the metal one way, and i saw that the top part wa
is a geographer on the staff of the china science academy's research center. his area of study is the northeast industrial region. there are over 1,000 factories in the tiexi industrial ne, which spreads along the west side of shenyang. many state-owned enterprises have factories here. they are typical of those that made up the backbone of the sialist economy. ( speaking chinese ) translator: one of the problems facing the tiexi industrial zone at the present time is the aging of its plants and uipment. quite a lot of it is old and is still in use after more than 20 years. actually, some of this equipment has been used for more than 30 years. the second problem ithat most of the factories in the region make everything they need in-house. this inefficient use of resources has resulted in many factories operating in the red. narrator: the shenyang number one machine tool works in tiexi is one such operation. its long history goes back to 1935, when manchuria was occupied by japan. the japanese established the region as a base of manufacturing for export to japan. they built a railroad and factori
to become "the rice bowl of japan." so we really see a huge intervention by people-- science and technology-- in order to... for this particular region to become the rice bowl that it is now. narrator: by mid-may, the long winter has finally ended and it is time to plant. kobayashi fukuzo is a farmer of recognized skill. at 71, he knows how unforgiving the weather can be. he worries constantly about what he should do mechanized agriculture allows to anto continue to farm.rice. the fields are irrigated. irrigation is crucial. the rice seedlings depend on water, rather than soil, for much-needed nutrients. rice farmers in northeastern japan have a traditional enemy. called yamase, this cold wind can blow through the region anytime from june to mid-august. while it can be absent for years, in 1993, yamase caused extensive crop damage in tohoku. when the cold winds blow, temperatures drop, fog develops, and the plants don't get enough sunlight. stunted alks are a bad omen. thflower clusters, which precede the grains of rice should be much bigger. kanno hiromitsu is an atmospheric geographer. he
's suppose we take those flippers and cut them off. [laughter] it's for science. all right? all right. now it could take the tail on to it, right? all right. we cut the tail off. with the eyeballs. okay. now, oh let's suppose we-- that's a little cruel. let's suppose we just take the flippers and put scotch tape over them, okay, and put a couple of splints in the tail. okay. now, how can the fish go down if it wants to go down? how many say, "it can't do anything now, got no flippers"? how many say, "i think the fish still can go down"? here's a little hint. if the fish is gonna go down, what does the fish have to do to its density, make it more or less? more. is there any way for the fish to change its density? yes. what can it do? breathes off the air. it can contract its--bladder. it can make its volume smaller. if it pulls in on its bladder, pulls in, it'll sink, okay? and so the-- let's suppose, all of a sudden, you put better food at the top. how's it gonna get to the top? it's gonna push out. push out, make the volume larger and it's gonna go right to the top. so a fish varies its d
, palestinian history and political science professors aleh -- saleh hamayel. >> whenever a colonial settler situation never used the natives as their force, their fate was always genocide. total, physical extermination. now that was not easy to do in the middle of the 20th-century. fortunately for us, the done is to project came in 1948. it was too late to duplicate what happened for the indians of north america. >> your response, dennis banks, to the palestinian political science professor? >> i think -- his presence is very strong. i listened intently to what he was saying. after we had a chance to look at the comparisons of this happening in palestine now as to what happened with us during the 1930's and 1940's. it is the same pattern. i said that on the very first day when this -- what is happening to those people is what we went through during the last century. it is, unfortunately, it is the same people. it is the u.s. government with funneled money to israel and then it goes to hurt the palestinian people. >> dennis banks, thank you for being with us today as we conclude this day of
right on through? like in the science fiction stories. why? why does it stop? how can i make contact with the table, if this is mostly empty space and the table is mostly empty space? how many say that there is no explanation for that? there is an explanation, gang. you know what it is? oh, nobody be knowing. one be knowing. so you guys didn't have a chance to read the book this weekend. check the neighbor-- see if the neighbor knows. why is it you don't fall through your chair? anyone have any ideas? anyone? trish. do the charges repel each other? yes, electrical charges, right on, wonderful. wonderful. remember, we talked about the atom here, these electrons repelling other electrons? any electrons on your seat? yes, any electrons on your seat? and when these electrons squished closer and closer, what do they do? begin with "r" end with "l". they repel and this is an electrical repulsion, my friend, between you and the chairs upon which you sit. let's put it this way. let's suppose this table-- pretend this table is a magnet. you guys know about magnets repelling. turn around, they
itself to, well, what if we do science, do chemistry, differently? most skin care products are based in water. what if we start playing and see what we can do with fruit juice-basing? >> turns out all those fruit and vegetable juice bases that are high in antioxidants and vitamins that are good for our overall health are precisely what the skin needs, too. you see, from the green apple body cleanser to the antioxidant serum, each product in the line has a raw ingredient base of 70% or higher and is packed with freshly squeezed juice concentrate--apples, cherries, pomegranates, grapes, raspberries. you name the fruit, and this duo is finding a way for nature to nurture our skin. >> we work with almost 29 different organic fruit juices. that's our start point. and to those juices, you'll see me adding the other 100-plus ingredients that we purchase organically, and those ingredients include everything from plantils to essential oils to herbs to honey. you name it. if we can get it organic, it's finitely on our ingredient listing. >> in the base, melissa usually starts with apple juice,
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)